Marriage equality ruling in Pennsylvania

Excerpts from Judge Jones’ ruling in Whitewood v Wolf.  Beautiful…

Today, certain citizens of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania are not guaranteed the right to marry the person they love. Nor does Pennsylvania recognize the marriages of other couples who have wed elsewhere. Hoping to end this injustice, eleven courageous lesbian and gay couples, one widow, and two teenage children of one of the aforesaid couples have come together as plaintiffs and asked this Court to declare that all Pennsylvanians have the right to marry the person of their choice and consequently, that the Commonwealth’s laws to the contrary are unconstitutional. We now join the twelve federal district courts across the country which, when confronted with these inequities in their own states, have concluded that all couples deserve equal dignity in the realm of civil marriage.

With the weight and impetus of the foregoing Supreme Court jurisprudence in mind, this Court is not only moved by the logic that the fundamental right to marry is a personal right to be exercised by the individual, but also rejects Defendants’ contention that concepts of history and tradition dictate that same-sex marriage is excluded from the fundamental right to marry. The right Plaintiffs seek to exercise is not a new right, but is rather a right that these individuals have always been guaranteed by the United States Constitution.

Based on the foregoing, we hold that Pennsylvania’s Marriage Laws violate both the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.  Because these laws are unconstitutional, we shall enter an order permanently enjoining their enforcement.  By virtue of this ruling, same-sex couples who seek to marry in Pennsylvania may do so, and already married same-sex couples will be recognized as such in the Commonwealth.

The issue we resolve today is a divisive one.  Some of our citizens are made deeply uncomfortable by the notion of same-sex marriage.  However, that same-sex marriage causes discomfort in some does not make it’s prohibition constitutional.  Nor can past tradition trump the bedrock constitutional guarantees of due process and equal protection.  Were that not so, ours would still be a racially segregated nation according to the now rightfully discarded doctrine of ‘separate but equal’.  In the sixty years since Brown was decided, ‘separate’ has thankfully faded into history, and only ‘equal’ remains.  Similarly, in future generations the label same-sex marriage will be abandoned, to be replaced simply by marriage.

We are better people than what these laws represent, and it is time to discard them into the ash heap of history.

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About justgngr

the ramblings of a medical professional by day, judgmental ginger by night
This entry was posted in emotional, LGBT, politics, relationships and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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